3 Things I Learned by Transitioning from SAHM to Working Mom

by ParentCo. January 16, 2015

Recently I've made the monumental shift from stay at home mom to full time career lady. My first kid was born nine years ago, and while I worked for a small boutique in the years after his birth, I left the job and never went back after having my second. For the last three years, I've been knee deep in library story hours, music times, and wiping things. Wiping so.many.things. A little over a year ago, I needed an outlet. Something that required me to use my brain for something other than making snacks and reading Good Night Moon over and over again. Like tens of thousands of women before me, I started a blog. But I made a promise to myself and anyone that would be so gracious as to take time reading, I wasn't going to subject anyone to another crafty, recipe laden aren't-kids-just-the-most-magical-creatures-fake-fest. I set out to be honest. Often, life with kids is awesome. Occasionally it blows chunks. (Literally.) For a few hours each week, I would sneak off to a coffee shop and hunker down to peck out 600-1000 words on something that had me thinking. I harassed my friends to read it and they were kind enough to share it with theirs. The universe conspired to parlay those efforts into what you are reading right now. These are a few things I've come to realize in this change.

1. I truly enjoy being around adults.

I feel incredibly fortunate to have spent the first years of my youngest's life at her beck and call. Yet as much as I made a concerted effort to get out of the house and socialize both of us, I'd still find myself engaging everyone from cashiers to the mailman in inane conversation just because they spoke actual words. On more than a few occasions, I accusingly asked my husband if he washed his hands upon exiting the bathroom. When you're with kids all day, it comes with the territory. Personally, I love kiddos. Even ones that aren't mine. They are startlingly honest, delightfully irreverent, and often easy to please. Plus, they'll clear their schedule at the drop of a hat for an ice cream date. (Adults could really stand to learn a few things.) However, they're terrible at discussing the intricacies of Breaking Bad, they sneeze directly into your mouth, and some days they rapidly fire questions that would make Albert Einstein feel like taking a nap in traffic. Spending large stretches of the day creating something with intelligent, forward thinking people who don't wear diapers (so far as I know, though this is totally unconfirmed) is fantastic.

2. Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

Allegedly, that phrase was penned around 1839 by Thomas Haynes Bayly, but that's a really strange name for a working mom. I'm going to have to credit Tina Fey instead, as that suits my needs better. In any event, I am going to go on record and say that there's no better feeling than a small person who thinks you're cooler than Gwen Stefani (spoiler alert, children who may need glasses:this is not possible) launches like a flying squirrel into your arms before you can even take off your coat. That never happens when you're nose to nose day in and day out.

3. I'm a better parent when I feel more financially secure.

There's no debating that raising kids is expensive. There's also no doubt that worrying about paying your bills can permeate every moment of your day. At its worst, it boils over and you cry because your kid spilled an entire carton of milk all over the counter when you have $7 dollars left in your account until next week. (I acknowledge that this is in no way the worst for some families. I am only speaking from my own experience.) On the better days, it's just the way you hold your breath as you wait between punching in your pin and being handed your receipt at the grocery store. Our needs are few. But knowing they can be met quiets that voice that can yell louder than two kids banging pots and pans while tap dancing.


ParentCo.

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