Breast-Fed Babies May Have Longer DNA Telomeres

by Parent Co. August 08, 2016

Breast-fed babies have healthier immune systems, score higher on I.Q. tests and may be less prone to obesity than other babies.

Now new research reveals another possible difference in breast-fed babies: They may have longer telomeres.

Telomeres are stretches of DNA that cap the ends of chromosomes and protect the genes from damage. They’re often compared to the plastic tips at the end of shoelaces that prevent laces from unraveling. Telomeres shorten as cells divide and as people age, and shorter telomeres in adulthood are associated with chronic diseases like diabetes. Some studies have linked longer telomeres to longevity.

Source: Breast-Fed Babies May Have Longer Telomeres, Tied to Longevity - The New York Times


Parent Co.

Author



Also in Conversations

The Best Predictor of Success, According to Science

by Parent Co. May 10, 2021

We want to set children up on a path towards success later in life. What contributes to a person’s success in the long-term?

Continue Reading

drawing of a person on the forest covered with snow
7 Picture Books That Help Kids Cope With Tragedy

by Jennifer Garry May 10, 2021

These books deal with topics like fear, loss, and separation anxiety in subtle ways, but can serve as great conversation starters.

Continue Reading

How to Talk About Sex: Early, Often, and in Small Doses

by Pam Moore May 10, 2021

We are sexual beings from the moment we are born. So, why is it so hard for so many parents to talk to our kids about sex and sexuality?

Continue Reading