Is it Okay to Salt Your Child's Food?

by Parent Co. August 19, 2016

Yes, in moderation. High salt intake is linked with an increased risk of high blood pressure, and the American Heart Association and other groups recommend that children limit sodium intake to 1,500 to 2,300 milligrams a day (a teaspoon of salt contains about 2,300 milligrams of sodium). But kids typically get far more than that, usually from restaurant fare and processed foods, which account for77 percent of the sodium in Americans’ diets. Adding a pinch of salt to foods can also be a useful tool to condition children to like nutritious — yet bitter — foods, like broccoli or cauliflower. “What salt does in many cuisines around the world is take the bitter edge out of food and make it more palatable,” said Julie Mennella, a biopsychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.
Source: Should You Salt a Child's Food? - The New York Times


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