Sick of White Boys and Dogs, 11 Year Old Starts #1000BlackGirlBooks

by ParentCo. January 26, 2016

Eleven year old middle-schooler Marley Dias told her mom she was fed up. I told her I was sick of reading about white boys and dogs. Her mom encouraged her to take action, asking her what she planned to do about it. Dias had an idea: ...start a book drive, and a specific book drive, where black girls are the main characters in the book and not background characters or minor characters. The goal of Dias' #1000BlackGirlBooks book drive is to collect 1000 books by February 1st, a goal she's well on her way to reaching. Dias is spearheading the project as a member of the GrassROOTS Community Foundation Super Camp, described on the site as "a summer leadership camp for girls of African ancestry." This is not the first time Dias has worked to make a difference. Last year, she wrote and won a grant to serve food to orphans in Ghana. Dias says when she grows up she wants to be a magazine editor, and she plans to continue taking social action for the rest of her life. You can read more about Marley Dias and her projects, as well as other SuperGirl social action projects, on the SuperGirl web site, BAM. Source: PhillyVoice


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