The Universal Nope Face

by ParentCo. March 28, 2016

Researchers have identified a single, universal facial expression that is interpreted across many cultures as the embodiment of negative emotion. The look proved identical for native speakers of English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese and American Sign Language (ASL). It consists of a furrowed brow, pressed lips and raised chin, and because we make it when we convey negative sentiments, such as “I do not agree,” researchers are calling it the “not face.” The study, published in the journal Cognition, also reveals that our facial muscles contract to form the “not face” at the same frequency at which we speak or sign words in a sentence. That is, we all instinctively make the “not face” as if it were part of our spoken or signed language.
via: Ohio State University Newsroom


ParentCo.

Author



Also in Conversations

little boy playing with toy car
How to Praise your Kids: A Process Praise Primer

by Jessica Williams

To put it simply, process praise is praise that emphasizes the work, effort, or actions of the child. Praise contributes to our kids' development.

Continue Reading

kid in glasses reading book
12 Books that Reflect the Diversity of the World Around Us

by ParentCo.

I want my children to know that many kids look and live differently than they do. These wonderful, powerful, and fun books can help.

Continue Reading

woman holding baby and laughing
Fighting for my Autistic Son to Stay in his General Education Classroom

by Megan Burgess

Why is my autistic son in a general education classroom? I could argue it's for inclusion, but the truth is, I fought to keep him there because it felt right.

Continue Reading