Why are Parents so Afraid to Leave Kids Alone?

Leaving a child unattended is considered taboo in today’s intensive parenting atmosphere, despite evidence that American children are safer than ever. So why are parents denying their children the same freedom and independence that they themselves enjoyed as children? A new study by social scientists suggests that our fears of leaving children alone have become systematically exaggerated in recent decades – not because the practice has become more dangerous, but because it has become socially unacceptable.

Source: Why are we so afraid to leave children alone? — ScienceDaily

iPAD Use Pre-Surgery Can Help Calm Anxiety in Kids

Date: August 29, 2016

Source: World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists

Summary: New research shows that allowing children to use iPads to distract them before surgery requiring general anesthesia is as effective at lowering their anxiety as conventional sedatives.

Mobile interactive tools have been found to be effective to reduce child anxiety at parental separation in the operating theatre. The authors’ aim in this study was to compare the effects of midazolam (a sedative used regularly before anaesthesia) in premedication with age-appropriate game apps (on an iPad tablet) on children aged 4-10 years during and after ambulatory (day) surgery…

The researchers found both parental and child anxiety levels to be similar in both groups, with a similar pattern of evolution. Both parents and nurses found anaesthesia more satisfying in the iPad group.

Dr Chassard concludes: “Our study showed that child and parental anxiety before anaesthesia are equally blunted by midazolam or use of the iPad. However, the quality of induction of anaesthesia, as well as parental satisfaction, were judged better in the iPad group. Use of iPads or other tablet devices is a non-pharmacologic tool which can reduce perioperative stress without any sedative effect in paediatric ambulatory surgery.”

Source: iPads as effective as sedatives for children before operations — ScienceDaily

Doesn’t Stretch & Not Comfortable, Not For Me-Back to School

The first rule of shopping for kids: If it doesn’t stretch, they’re probably not going to wear it

…all too familiar with these requirements—as are many US parents currently bracing themselves for back-to-school shopping… These demands about clothes aren’t exactly new—young people have complained about bothersome clothes for ages—but earlier generations of children begged to wear jeans instead of more formal dresses or trousers. Today’s children are looking for something that’s even more casual and comfy…

The trend (perhaps an unsurprising one in the age of athleisure, when activewear routinely doubles as everyday attire among grown-ups) is evident in what retailers are selling. According to data from Edited, a retail technology company whose clients include the luxury retailer Net-a-Porter, there are 20% more leggings stocked than jeans in the kidswear sections…In the last three months, online retailers got 56% more new arrivals of leggings than jeans, and new arrivals of sweatpants trailed jeans by just 18%…

This shift toward the casual and stretchy creates some dilemmas for parents who feel their little ones are a too dressed-down, especially as they get them ready to return from summer break to the more formal environment of school.

Fashion in the years ahead may see formal dress codes breaking down further, synthetics such as polyester continuing to grow, and softness and stretch becoming more common in even the most rugged jeans.

 Source: The first rule of back-to-school shopping for kids: If it doesn’t stretch, they’re probably not going to wear it — Quartz

Emotional Flexibility for Teen Girls and Their Mothers A True Benefit

Queen’s University…published new research on the emotional bonds between mothers and adolescent daughters. The study examined how well mother-daughter pairs were able to manage rapid transitions between emotional states and the so-called “emotional rollercoaster” of adolescence.

As expected, pairs with low flexibility…reported lower relationship quality and higher levels of maternal symptoms. Those who showed moderate levels of flexibility showed higher relationship quality and lower maternal symptoms…those with the highest degree of flexibility showed no associations with relationship quality or symptoms – suggesting that a moderate degree of flexibility is optimal for a strong and healthy relationship.

In addition, the study found that the degree of flexibility demonstrated was consistently related to the mothers’ depression and anxiety symptoms, though not with the symptoms reported by their daughters…

“The adolescent developmental period is an important transition for parents and adolescents alike,” says Dr. Lougheed. “Generally speaking, parents and teens who are able to ‘go with the flow’ of new emotional experiences in their relationship will likely be show better well-being in other ways as well.”

Source: News Release – Queen’s researchers measure benefits of emotional flexibility in the relationship between mothers and adolescent daughters. | Queen’s Gazette | Queen’s University

3 Meals A Day? NO Try Doing This

Dogmatic adherence to mealtimes is anti-science, racist, and might actually be making you sick.

Meals are good, and snacking is bad. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and if you eat dinner with your family, you will keep your girlish figure and your kids will be healthier. Taking a lunch break will make you succeed at your job.

Okay, now forget all that. Because as it turns out, the concept of three square meals a day has practically zero to do with your actual metabolic needs. And our dogmatic adherence to breakfast, lunch, and dinner might actually be making us sick.

The three daily meals that the settlers brought evolved with Americans’ lifestyles. As people became more prosperous, they added meat to breakfast and dinner. After the Industrial Revolution, when people began to work away from home, the midday meal became a more casual affair, and the cooked meal shifted to the end of the day, when workers came home. The one thing that did not change was the overall amount of food that people ate…Soon, doctors reported that more of their patients were suffering from indigestion.

In an effort to rein in caloric intake, nutritionists began advising people to eat a lighter breakfast—

That line of reasoning persists today—check out Kellogg’s modern-day treatise on the health benefits of breakfast. But there’s just one problem: Science shows that when it comes to maintaining your metabolism—the bodily system that helps us turn food into energy and, when out of whack, can lead to diabetes and other disorders—it doesn’t make a whit of difference whether you eat breakfast or not.

And breakfast isn’t the only metabolically unimportant meal. In fact, it doesn’t seem to matter much at all how and when you get your calories.

The one thing that might actually improve your metabolism is periodic fasting—that’s right, the very same eating pattern that the early European settlers deemed uncivilized…caloric deprivation acts as a mild stress that helps cells build up their defenses—warding off damage from aging, environmental toxins, and other threats.

Biologist Satchidananda Panda of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, meanwhile, observed in a 2012 study that mice consuming all of their calories within an eight-hour window were less likely to develop metabolic diseases like diabetes than those who ate whenever they pleased.

So should you quit meals and fast intermittently instead? You could try it.

Instead of obsessing about meal size and frequency, Ochner recommends something simpler: Don’t eat when it’s time for a meal; eat when you feel hungry.

Source: Why You Should Stop Eating Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner | Mother Jones

Post Brexit Vote Consumer Confidence High in The UK

British consumers have regained some of the confidence they lost after the Brexit vote in June, according to a survey published on Friday, the latest sign that households are largely taking the decision to leave the European Union in their stride.

The YouGov/CEBR Consumer Confidence Index rose by 3.2 points in August, its biggest month-to-month jump since February 2013.

The index, which stands at 109.8, has now recovered around half of the ground it lost following the EU referendum.

“This month’s improvement in consumer confidence follows positive news from other areas of the economy and slightly punctures the arguments of those who predicted immediate economic Armageddon following a Brexit vote,” Scott Corfe, Centre for Economics and Business Research director, said.

Source: UK consumers recover some confidence after Brexit vote hit – survey | Reuters

New Apple iPhone Update a Must-Here is Why

Apple just released a patch that fixes three giant vulnerabilities in iOS.

The software update that Apple just released for every iPhone and iPad doesn’t activate any new features—but it does patch three enormous security holes that would allow a savvy hacker to access just about every corner of an iOS device.

If exploited correctly, those flaws allow an intruder unprecedented access to an iPhone. They allow attackers to read every email, text message, calendar item, and file saved on the device; peruse photos and videos; listen in on phone calls; track the device’s location; and remotely turn on its microphone and camera…

“One of the most sophisticated pieces of cyber-espionage software we’ve ever seen.” Documentation that describes how the malware works indicates it can “self-destruct” if it’s in danger of being found, silently erasing itself off of the phone.

To download the software update on an iPhone, open the Settings app, tap General, and then tap Software Update. Do it now.

Source: Update Your iPhone Now: A New Patch Fixes 3 Giant Vulnerabilities – The Atlantic

Uncharted Roads for New Peace Deal by Columbian Government and Farc

After 52 years of war, government and guerrillas present disarmament and justice plan that Colombian voters will be asked to ratify in a plebiscite

Colombia’s government has secured a groundbreaking peace deal with leftist Farcrebels – promising to end a war that wracked the country for more than half a century, killing tens of thousands and displacing millions.

…“We have won the most beautiful of all battles: [the battle] of peace for Colombia. The battle with weapons ends and the battle of ideas begins.”

Under the agreement, the government commits to development programmes and addressing gross inequalities in the country’s long-neglected rural sector…the opportunities of political participation to smaller political movements, including the party that a demobilised Farc may create.

The Farc agrees to help dismantle and discourage the business of drug crops and trafficking that helped sustain its war financially for the past three decades.

Critics say the accord should be renegotiated to include jail time for crimes against humanity and a ban on those convicted of such crimes from holding public office.

But in a world wracked by conflict, Colombia had become a sign of hope, said Herbolzheimer. “It shows that no matter how complex a conflict is, if there is political will there is a political solution.”

Source: Farc peace deal: rebels and Colombian government sign accord to end war | World news | The Guardian

Patent Granted to Tesla for Early Drone The Year 1898

Nikola Tesla was both of his time and ahead of it (he has a car company named after him, after all). Besides his contributions to altnerating current electrical systems, the inventor predicted smartphones, television, and apparently drones…

In a patent that was granted on November 8, 1898, Tesla wrote that his invention required no wires or electrical conductors. Instead, he said he found a way to move the “vessels” by “producing waves, impulses, or radiations which are received through the earth, water, or atmosphere”

Tesla saw the potential in drone warfare over a century before unmanned aerial vehicles (or UAVs) were being used … The US alone has killed thousands of people in drone strikes.

The first drone used in warfare…was invented for World War I. The Kettering Bug was a bomb-carrying biplane that could fly on a preset route to a target, although it wasn’t perfected until the war was over.

…interesting to look back at Tesla’s patents to see what one of the most controversial scientific minds of the late 19th and early 20th centuries was focused on.

Source: In 1898, Nikola Tesla Predicted Drone Warfare