New Study Shows That People in Their 40s Are Happiest

New research published in Developmental Psychology suggests that people are happier in their early 40s (midlife) than they were at age 18.

A number of studies have claimed that happiness declines from the early 20s to middle age (40 to 60). That low point is known, of course, as the “mid-life crisis.”

Well, maybe it’s all a myth.

New research published in Developmental Psychology suggests that happiness doesn’t stall in midlife. Instead, it’s part of an upward trajectory beginning in our teens and early twenties.

This study is reviewed as far more reliable than research that came before.

Other findings:

  • People are happier in their early 40s (midlife) than they were at age 18
  • Happiness rises fastest between age 18 and well into the 30s
  • Happiness is higher in years when people are married and in better physical health, and lower in years when people are unemployed
  • The rise in happiness to midlife refutes the purported “u-bend” in happiness, which assumes that happiness declines between the teens and the 40s and cumulates in a  midlife crisis

The difference in results from other studies of happiness is attributed to longitudinal data. Past efforts to report on life span happiness are reported by the researchers as “fundamentally flawed.”

Source: University of Alberta. “New study challenges ‘mid-life crisis’ theory”  via ScienceDaily.
Journal Reference:
Nancy L. Galambos, Shichen Fang, Harvey J. Krahn, Matthew D. Johnson, Margie E. Lachman. Up, not down: The age curve in happiness from early adulthood to midlife in two longitudinal studies. Developmental Psychology, 2015; 51 (11): 1664 DOI:10.1037/dev0000052