Apps that invade kids’ privacy are "recipe for arrested development"

by ParentCo. April 14, 2016

From "Parents Shouldn’t Spy on Their Kids" by Kirsten Weir in Nautilus. A parent’s desire to spy might have less to do with keeping kids safe, and more to do with a burning desire to lower his or her own anxiety. “We can trace a path over time from feelings of privacy invasion to higher levels of secrecy to parents’ reduced perceptions of knowledge about their children,” says Skyler Hawk, a social psychologist who studies adolescent development at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. “If parents are engaging in highly intrusive behaviors, it is ultimately going to backfire on them.” And covert spying, Hawk adds, isn’t likely to stay covert for long. Most kids are more tech savvy than their parents. Odds are good they’ll discover those tracking apps and figure out how to hack the system—leaving their location-tracking phone in their locker when they ditch class, or setting up a second (secret) Instagram account.


ParentCo.

Author



Also in Conversations

mom in bed with sick child
How to Keep Kids Healthy This Cold & Flu Season

by Dr. Jeff Andrews

As we head into the upcoming cold and flu season, parents should be mindful of the following best practices to keep their families safe and healthy.

Continue Reading

young girl with horse
The Surprising Way Horses Benefit Kids' Emotional and Social Skills

by ParentCo.

Kids can enjoy so many benefits from being with horses, from confidence and a sense of self-efficacy to assertive and emotional communication skills.

Continue Reading

girl listening to music
Songs for snuggling and singing and falling asleep

by ParentCo.

For the past nine plus years, I've sung this song nearly every night. I suppose I had an average affinity for it as a child.

Continue Reading