Here's Why Hanger Is Real

by ParentCo. March 26, 2016

There's science behind "hanger."

Exercising self-control all day long uses a lot of energy, largely in the form of glucose. As Medical News Today explains, our bodies break down food to make glucose, which helps the brain function. But there’s more to it than that. Lauren Slayton, MS, RD, founder of Foodtrainers, a nutrition practice in NYC, adds, “The body tries to compensate when blood glucose decreases by releasing certain hormones.” These hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline, increase aggressiveness, amping up your hangry behavior. The best way to avoid getting hangry is to eat regularly. Slayton suggests a “four-hour rule” — never go more than four hours without something to eat. H/T: The Daily Beast


ParentCo.

Author



Also in Conversations

Hands splashing on water
5 Sensory Experiences That Can Enhance Learning and Benefit Any Kid

by ParentCo.

Sensory experiences can help increase focus and concentration and calm anxiety and hyperactivity in all kids- not just those with special needs.

Continue Reading

child playing play musical instrument
4 Ways to Introduce Your Kids to Classical Music

by ParentCo.

Research suggests that classical music can have positive effects for children, including memory development, creativity, and self-expression. Plus, it's fun!

Continue Reading

electronic waste drawing illustration
How to Help Your Child Build and Maintain a Positive Digital Identity

by ParentCo.

As a parent in the millennial age, understanding our digital identities is crucial. What can we do to teach our kids to navigate this complex digital world?

Continue Reading