Study Looks to Support Autistic Children with Adapting to School

by ParentCo. June 27, 2016

A University of Manchester-led study is testing whether an intervention with parents and teachers can help children with autism transfer newly acquired social communication skills from home into school. Autism is a common developmental disorder, with a prevalence of around 1% of the population. The 'Paediatric Autism Communication Trial-Generalised' (PACT-G) study...will test new ways to transfer the child's improving communication skills into the education setting... ...enable the researchers to study the mechanism behind this transfer of skills across different settings... The research team will work with school staff using the same techniques they use with parents, as well as encouraging parents and Learning Support Assistants to communicate regularly together about goals and strategies. The aim is to generate a similar change in school to that generated with parents in the home. "...It's a real partnership where we discuss the meaning of his communication and I always go away understanding him so much better with insight."
Source: Helping children with autism transfer new communication skills from home to school -- ScienceDaily



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