Why Teen-Agers Are the Worst - The New Yorker

by ParentCo. August 24, 2015

Why are teens, in some ways, more difficult to parent than toddlers? Science may have some answers.
The frontal lobes are the seat of what’s sometimes called the brain’s executive function. They’re responsible for planning, for self-awareness, and for judgment. Optimally, they act as a check on impulses originating in other parts of the brain. But in the teen years, Jensen points out, the brain is still busy building links between its different regions. This process involves adding myelin around the axons, which conduct electrical impulses. (Myelin insulates the axons, allowing impulses to travel faster.) It turns out that the links are built starting in the back of the brain, and the frontal lobes are one of the last regions to get connected. They are not fully myelinated until people are in their twenties, or even thirties. This is where parents step in. “You need to be your teens’ frontal lobes until their brains are fully wired,” Jensen writes. By this she seems to mean near-constant hectoring.
Read the full article: Why Teen-Agers Are the Worst - The New Yorker


ParentCo.

Author



Also in Conversations

How to Prepare your Toddler for a Parent’s Trip Away
How to Prepare your Toddler for a Parent’s Trip Away

by Yelena Shuster

Before you spend weeks creating endless to-do lists to help your toddler while you’re away, take a step back and prep yourself first. Here's a simple guide.

Continue Reading

women holding pride flag
4 Ways to Support Your LGBTQ Teen

by ParentCo.

As parents, we have to be ready to have all sorts of big conversations. When it comes to coming out, there are a few simple things to remember.

Continue Reading

 little boy playing with colorful modeling clay
Raising a Financially Savvy Kid

by Angela Pruess

These are some straightforward ways parents can take the ‘money bull’ by the horns and help their children start out on solid monetary ground.

Continue Reading