Do We Need a Community in Order to Truly Feel Joy?

by Parent Co. May 19, 2016

Psychologists have had a great deal to say about the connection between social isolation and depression. Examples include the loss of a spouse to divorce or bereavement. Moreover, the epidemic of modern depression is linked to urbanization, the loss of extended families, and other changes, such as frequent moves in search of work, that disrupt long-standing social relationships. Such phenomena have been the focus of attention for health researchers seeking to understand why some communities enjoy better health than others. We are not incapable of being happy when alone, of course, but there is a specific type of happiness that is induced by group interactions. People suddenly deprived of these experiences – for example by retiring – are more vulnerable to depression. The same is certainly true of the smallest group – such as a married couple - whose social reality exists independent of other groups.
Source: Is Joy Communal? | Psychology Today



Parent Co.

Author



Also in Conversations

The Best Predictor of Success, According to Science

by Parent Co. May 10, 2021

We want to set children up on a path towards success later in life. What contributes to a person’s success in the long-term?

Continue Reading

drawing of a person on the forest covered with snow
7 Picture Books That Help Kids Cope With Tragedy

by Jennifer Garry May 10, 2021

These books deal with topics like fear, loss, and separation anxiety in subtle ways, but can serve as great conversation starters.

Continue Reading

How to Talk About Sex: Early, Often, and in Small Doses

by Pam Moore May 10, 2021

We are sexual beings from the moment we are born. So, why is it so hard for so many parents to talk to our kids about sex and sexuality?

Continue Reading